The Ultimate Trail Guide to the Greater Seattle Region

Even through the development and construction, Seattle and the Greater Seattle Area remain an idealistic place for outdoorspeople and our growing population of cyclists. Grabbing your bicycle and hitting a trail can be both exhilarating and allow you to explore a different side of the city.

The local enthusiasm for cycling isn’t misguided, as it serves multiple purposes and provides hours of entertainment and exercise. This ultimate bike guide will help you find the right one in your area – right outside your front door!

Seattle

  • The Alki Trail. This 5.5-mile trail runs the peninsula of West Seattle along the water. Though patrons suggest you “watch for roots”, this trail is excellent for bicyclists in the city!
  • Though the Burke-Gilman Trail runs from Seattle to Bothell, this trail is a local mainstay. It’s 18.8 miles is not for the faint of heart, but it proves an exhilarating ride!
  • Comprised of asphalt, the Chief Sealth Trail is a 4-mile trail is great for urban-dwellers. If you live in South Seattle, you could probably walk to a trailhead from your home!
  • The I-90 Trail is one that is most frequented by commuters from or to the Bellevue or Seattle. At 8.8-miles, it gets in that morning exercise without setting back your days’ progress. It’s paved and well-maintained and offers wonderful views of Lake Washington.

Eastside

  • The Cedar River Trail extends from Renton’s Cedar River Park into Hobart. At 15.7-miles, the trail is largely paved, but the last stretch passed the Maple Valley Trailhead comprises packed gravel.
  • This Bellevue trail, otherwise known as the Coal Creek Trail, is great for beginners who want to stay close to home. At 3.7-miles, this Bellevue to Newcastle hike comprises a dirt, grass, and woodchips surface along wide paths and a steep façade.
  • The Cross-Kirkland Corridor is in a forward trajectory, meaning the city of Kirkland sees a bright future in the form of corridor expansion. This trail currently rests at 5.8 miles and stays within the Kirkland limits.
  • The Issaquah-Preston Trail proves an endearing 4.8-mile trek through the urban wilderness. Though on the short side of Pacific Northwest trails, its largely unused and you can often find yourself the only person out!
  • The North Creek Trail is in Snohomish and stands at 7.8-miles. A step through nature, you can often birdwatch and see the abundant wildlife sifting through the underbrush.
  • Redmond is known for many things, including the Redmond Central Connector. At 2.4-miles, it’s a great way to connect the Sammamish River and Bear Creek Trails and enjoy a little loop into downtown Redmond.

North End

  • This 7.25-miles, known as the North Creek Trail, proves a beautiful display of the PNW wetlands. Abundant with nature and wildlife, you’ll be sure to find the natural beauty and feel your pressures whisked away.
  • From Bothell to Redmond, the Sammamish River Trail connects the north end with the Eastside, via this 11-mile trail. It’s a proven love of local, depicted by its heavy weekend use and well-maintained passages.
  • One of the more bolstered trails on this list, the Snohomish County Centennial Trail rests at 30.5-miles. Some segments can be fairly busy, so make sure to keep an eye out for other patrons.

South End

  • This waterside trail offers beautiful Puget Sound views and the aroma of salty water and shoreside pine trees. The Des Moines Creek Trail connects various beachfront parks, where additional challenges and mountainous terrain can be sought.
  • Running from Tukwila to Kent, the Green River Trail runs the entre 19.6-mile span. Touted for it being a “great place for exercise” and “peaceful”, the trail is excellent for cyclists of all types.
  • The Foothills trails span from Puyallup to Enumclaw and comprise roughly 30-miles. It’s clean and great for any type of ride.
  • The Soos Creek Trail run 6-miles from north to south, in Kent, Washington. A well-paved and maintained trail, the Soos Creek offers tons of scenery and numerous trailheads – some very close to you Kent home!

Even Further Out…

  • Though not exactly in our backyard, this destination-bike trail is great for getting out of the city for a day. The Chehalis Western Trail is 21.2-miles and connects every major town in Thurston County, including our capitol, Olympia.
  • The Interurban Trail is one that spans a great distance, approximately 42-miles and from Everett all the way down to Fife, and is distinguished by a “North” and “South” designation. Largely comprised of asphalt paving, this trail is great for beginners, intermediate, and advanced cyclists.
  • The Cushman Trail is great for people looking for a challenge. Although it isn’t entirely challenging, it offers a bit of variety nestled between beautiful backdrops and the smell of northwestern pine.

The Pacific Northwest and the Greater Seattle area is abundant with cyclists, and our cities are further accommodation of a new favorite pastime. Endless more can be found on the local city websites and Washington State Trails Association website.

Think we missed an important trail? Leave the name in the comments below!