4 Up & Coming Ways to Commute Around the Greater Seattle Region

4 Up & Coming Ways to Commute Around the Greater Seattle Region

Seattle’s commute has proved horrendous for a while, but what are we doing about it? And how can we make it better?

According to an October 2017, GeekWire article, Seattle has the sixth longest average commute time, at 54.22 minutes – and, believe it or not, that number has actually reduced from an earlier February figure from King5. Though we’re still behind cities like Washington, CD, San Francisco, CA and New York, NY, the figure in minutes is only about a 6-minute difference. According to that same article, however, Seattle falls to number 17 in commute-related stress.

While vehicle transit makes up a large majority of Seattle’s average commuter, there are tons of other options coming down the pipeline.

One of the largest options in the newspapers are the Light Rail Expansions, and although it’s not settled to be “complete” (as per current projects) until 2039 for its furthest reaching, Tacoma expansion, and projects headway can be seen across the I-90 bridge and 2041 for the Kirkland-Issaquah service.

It seems a far in the future, but the 62 new miles, coming in at 116 miles total, of light rail is projected as one of the “most ambitious transit expansions this country has ever seen,” noted Snohomish County Executive, Dave Somers.

King County Metro has spoke about expanding bus service and boosting their late-night schedules. With 240 more trips each weekday, 100 more Saturday trips, 153 additional Sunday trips and the hiring of more than 2,800 transit operators, the metro system is confident to bolster service throughout the region.

Water Taxis are making a comeback as new options come to light. A fast-ferry has also been proposed for foot-traffic between Tacoma and Seattle. According to Curbed-Seattle, Tacoma’s City Councilor, Ryan Mello, there’s “a lot of regional interest” in the idea, but regulation bars them on a state level, leaving it up to the local governments to run with the idea. If this were to take effect, it could reduce the averaged 30-minute commute by 10-minutes.

Another fast-ferry could be on it’s way, connecting Seattle to Renton, Washington, via Lake Washington. Though this is the idea of a private developer, they hope to be up and running in 2020 – only a couple short years away!

Since so many other land-routes are clogged and bogged-down throughout the day, and especially during peak hours, water seems like the right way to go about reducing congestion.

Seattle’s Bicycle Master Plan was also implemented earlier this year (2017). The 2017-2021 plan, is a vision that bicycle riding throughout the region proves comfortable for people’s day-to-day life, for all ages and all abilities. Stay up to date on the Bike Master Plan page.

Ferries, buses, biking… they’re all the usual, but a huge way you can cut your commute in the meantime is to rideshare. Whether through private organizations or with your best buds, this is a great way for you to take advantage of perks, like cutting fuel cost and consumption, cheaper parking, use HOV/HOT lanes and avoid extraneous wear and tear on your vehicle.

Bottom line, many major metropolises are bearing a heavy burden, when it comes to its workers’ commute. Some drive times expanding 17-miles could take up to 90-minutes – or longer – in some cases. Something many agree on, is that solutions lie in data and technology, and “not necessarily in adding a big highway or building a big parking garage.”

What do you think about these potential or up and coming options? How drastically do you think they’ll reduce and relieve the average commute? Know of any more options? Let us know in the comments!

A By-Neighborhood Guide to Seattle’s Music Scene

A By-Neighborhood Guide to Seattle’s Music Scene

Seattle is a town known for its music. From Sunny Day Real Estate, Mudhoney, and Soundgarden, to Nevermore, the Postal Service, Classic Crime, and Macklemore, Seattle offers a rich music scene from 90’s grunge to indie rock, progressive metal, and hip hop.

While it’s true that many of the venues are bars and geared towards 21+, some aren’t, allowing people of any age to enjoy their favorite musical varieties. This list goes over some of the many Seattle venues that local, touring, and visiting artists and bands call home.


A 21+ venue, Slim’s Last Change Chili Shack & Watering Hole features music throughout the month, though not every day. Stay up-to-date on their website, by visiting their shows page.

West Seattle

The city that could have been, West Seattle features the “beach life” with a short drive of bustling, downtown Seattle. The peninsula is a bit more laid back, than the busy populace of Seattle’s thriving business district – and has amazing views of the Puget Sound and Olympic Peninsula.

Touted as West Seattle’s premier music venue, the Skylark features music of every variety, including indie rock, pop, electronica, hard rock, metal, and jazz. Note: some of their features are 21+, but there are a ton that are all ages.


Both Showbox venues (the Market and SODO) always bring a crowd. The SODO venue features its original beauty as a converted warehouse and has feature articles such as Heart and Taking Back Sunday.

Studio 7 proves and multi-faceted space, featuring artists throughout the week ranging from metal to hip hop to electronica. Their space includes their main club, dual level showroom, and 16 band rehearsal rooms.

Easily one of the largest venues in the area, the Washington Music Theater (WaMu Theater), has featured bands such as Slayer, Kid Cudi, and various music festivals. Their expansive space offers a variety of options from standing, sitting, and hanging out near refreshments if you need a break.

Columbia City

Over Beacon Hill, you’ll find a neighborhood known as Columbia City – and the Columbia City Theater. With the theater in back and the Bourbon Bar in from, this venue features an eclectic history and a past lineup just as varied.

With music seven days every week, the Royal Room was designed to serve the musicians and artists it hosts, and likewise offers an emphasis on creative programming and development and working collaboratively in a community space.

Pioneer Square

Moving north in Pioneer Square, you’ll want to stop by the Central Saloon. With a history for over 120 years, the Central Saloon not features “the best live rock seven nights a week,” 365 days per year.


Showbox Market is a beautiful art-deco style entertainment spot, with a full bar separate from the floor. Still displaying music for over 75 years, the Showbox Market has proved itself a mainstay in the Seattle music scene.

The HardRock Café near Downtown, Seattle often features live music on their second-floor venue.

The Triple Door is a beautiful music + eating venue. The front offers a delight dining area, while music patrons can sit and eat as they watch a variety of music, featuring artists such as Kaki King and Glockabelle.

The Seattle Theatre Group comprises the Paramount, Moor, and Neptune theaters.

Located under the Alaskan Way Viaduct, the Highway 99 Blues Club features a 21+ venue and combines the feelings of “southern juke joint”, with that of “old timey” architecture and concept.

Belltown and the Denny Triangle

These two areas are wonderful for bustling around town, and proves Seattle’s 4th most walkable and bikeable districts, according to Walkscore.com.

Offering a variety of daily delights, the Crocodile is touted on Paste Magazine’s list of top 40 music venues in the United States. Back in its years in the 1990’s, it was a swift ride to fame, as it featured many emerging and heavily popular bands throughout the grunge scene.

Dimitriou’s Jazz Alley is highly regarded amongst Seattle Jazz venues, featuring nightly shows, largely comprising jazz ensembles, pianists, vocalists, and guitarists.

Another stop along the Jazz train, it Tula’s Jazz Club, featuring jazz seven nights a week, plus “great Northwest and American cuisine.”

The Rendezvous Jewelry Box Theater remains an intimate venue, restored to its original 1932 beauty and offers live music and burlesque. Check out either the Jewelry Box or Grotto for daily entertainment!

Many mega-performers come through the Key Arena at Seattle Center, including bands such as Nine Inch Nails, Explosions in the Sky, Queens of the Stoneage, and many other popular artists.

Capitol Hill & South Lake Union

Amongst the best of Seattle’s urban charm, these two typical “Seattleite” neighborhoods are booming with eateries, bars, cafes, boutiques, and entertainment venues. Regardless of where you live, you’re only a short walk away from fun!

Neumos is another eclectic bar + venue, featuring bands such as the Raconteurs, Cannibal Corpse, Iron & Wine, Mudhoney, and a variety of others. They offer three full bars, a second-floor mezzanine, and a balcony overlooking the mainstage.

Though their bookings trend into metal and punk territory, the Highline has been a longstanding, Broadway venue, featuring a food and drink menu.

Another not-always 21+ venue, is Chop Suey. They offer a variety of tastes in music and cuisine (check out their menu!)

El Corazon and the Funhouse strive to provide the “ultimate concert and social experience,” while their staff focus on “excellent customer service and artist relations.” Enjoy a show. Chat with friends. Have a drink.

While the heart of Seattle hosts the majority of Seattle’s music venues, the northend has its fair share, including the High Dive, Nectar Lounge, The Little Red Hen, Sea Monster Lounge, Café Racer and the Blue Moon Tavern. (https://www.highdiveseattle.com/) (http://www.littleredhen.com/) (http://seamonsterlounge.com/) (http://caferacerseattle.com/) (https://bluemoonseattle.wordpress.com/)

What are your favorite Seattle venues? And where have you seen your favorite shows?