Bellevue is the fifth largest city in Washington State, with a population of 135,000 residents. Bellevue, Redmond and Kirkland make up the core of the Eastside’s high-tech and retail hub. More than 140,000 jobs are located in Bellevue, which means that more people work within the city than reside in it. Bellevue’s downtown core provides office space for thousands of professionals as well as condominiums and apartments for people who want to live in an urban setting.

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Lakemont is a planned community located primarily within the City of Bellevue with easternmost areas in the City of Issaquah. The Lakemont Community Association governs the neighborhoods, parks & trails within this community and Lakemont’s homes benefit from community-owned greenbelts and a pedestrian trail system connects residents to neighborhood parks, the regional Cougar Mountain Park and neighborhood shopping center at Lakemont. The neighborhood is served by the Issaquah School District.

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Newport Shores is located along the southeast shores of Lake Washington, west of I-405, in the city of Bellevue. The neighborhood is built around a series of man-made inlets, with homes oriented toward waterfront, boating and lake activities situated on approximately 172 acres with nearly 400 homes — over 100 which are lakefront, or man-made canal waterfront. The wide winding streets Newport Shores are perfect for biking, rollerblading and walking. The Lake Washington bike trail is easily accessible to the neighborhood, giving residents convenient bike access to Newcastle Beach Park and Mercer Slough Park.

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The Bellevue neighborhood of Somerset, with its iconic perch overlooking not only Bellevue surrounds, Lake Washington and Seattle—but also Puget Sound and the Olympic Mountains in the distance on a clear day—is a favorite vantage point to take in panoramic views of Bellevue and Seattle. Somerset’s more than 1,200 homes were predominantly constructed in the 1960’s and 70’s. Due to its proximity to Interstate 90 and Interstate 405, Somerset provides quick and easy access to employment, entertainment, and recreation. It also benefits from having nationally recognized schools from the triangulated Bellevue, Issaquah and Renton School Districts.

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West Bellevue is at the heart of the city’s center. The name “Bellevue” is French for “beautiful view”. In 2014, Bellevue was ranked as the 2nd best place to live in the nation by USA Today. The addition of many new high-rise condominium and apartments over the past decade has changed the scene in downtown Bellevue making it a very hip, walkable, and vibrant part of the Eastside. Many highly-desirable, longstanding and well-maintained single-family neighborhoods snuggle in to the north and south of downtown. The Mercer Slough Park and Bellevue Downtown Park are public open space landmarks of West Bellevue. Check out this recent Seattle Times article about Beaux Arts Village in West Bellevue.

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The Woodridge neighborhood, located in the City of Bellevue, is just south of downtown and east of Interstate 405. Characterized by quiet no-through streets and comfortable homes – many with views of Lake Washington, downtown Bellevue and Seattle, this community is truly just off the beaten path. Woodridge Elementary School, a part of Bellevue School District, is just at the top of the hill. Local parks include Bannerwood Ballfield Park, Kelsey Creek Park, Norwood Village Park, and Woodridge Water Tower Park.

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Bellevue could be referred to as a city within a park due to its abundant green spaces and the availability of outdoor recreation for residents to enjoy. Bellevue is home to 100+ parks, including ball fields, beach parks, and forested areas with plenty of hiking trails, and manicured meadows where you can toss a Frisbee. Below is a sample of Bellevue’s parks:

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Lake Washington is the signature freshwater lake situated between Seattle and the Eastside. It is the second largest natural lake in the state of Washington and is connected to Puget Sound via Lake Union and the Lake Washington ship canal. Sound and ocean going boat traffic from Lake Washington travels through the Montlake cut, Lake Union, the Fremont cut, and then the Hiram M. Chittenden “Ballard” Locks in its journey to the open water. Lake Washington is about 214 feet deep and 33.8 square miles.

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Lake Sammamish is the sixth largest lake in Washington, and one of the major recreational lakes—with high use by fishermen, boaters, water skiers, swimmers, and picnickers. The freshwater lake is 7 miles long and 1.5 miles wide, with a maximum depth of 105 feet and a surface area of 8 square miles. It lies east of Bellevue and west of the Sammamish Plateau, and stretches from Issaquah in the south to Redmond in the north. There are popular State and County parks along the shore including Marymoor Park at the lake’s north end, Lake Sammamish State Park at its south end and East Lake Sammamish Trail. Marymoor Park’s 640 acres include biking and walking trails, sports fields, rock climbing, a dog park, a radio control aircraft flying field, and a velodrome. Lake Sammamish State Park boasts 6,858 feet of waterfront along its 512 acres. The parks day-use facilities including an active boat launch, picnic tables and shelters, playgrounds, two swimming beaches, and softball and soccer fields.

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The Waterfront Report provides listing and sales data for private waterfront homes sited on major bodies of water in the greater Seattle-Eastside region. It includes an analysis of waterfront information including average cost per waterfront foot, average cost per square foot, and average sale price for Seattle, Mercer Island, Eastside and Lake Sammamish.

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